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I'm here to save your lunch. How to make the best salads in the world.

Twice this week, I have caught myself saying to myself (because I talk to myself a lot) "Salads are awesome, I love salad".

Then I laugh at myself for being a massive dork who likes salad AND talks to myself about it.

But it made me think about how often salad is done a great disservice as a food.

Up until my mid twenties, I hated salad. Salad was boring. But the reason I felt this way, was that I, like many children of the '80s, grew up with "salad" that consisted of strips of iceburg lettuce and watery tomatoes. The classic school dinner salad. With salad creme on the side. Possibly also with Spam.

So let's stop this right now. That stuff isn't salad. It's a very sad garnish with big ideas it hasn't got the backbone to live up to.

Then I learned that salad could be made with leaves that don't taste of refrigerator and sadness. And you can add all sorts of awesome things to make it super tasty and satisfying.

But those kinds of salads get a bad rap too. You've seen those calorie comparisons that show how a restaurant salad ends up with more calories and fat than the burger? So how can you make a salad which is delicious and also healthy?

Well, because I love you all, I made an infographic. It's not a recipe, because I don't know what you have in your fridge, or what you like to eat, but whether you like growing your own veg, buying it separately, or just buy a box of "rainbow salad" (those are the best, always go for colour) and add in a few extras, this will help you get the balance right.

It's got protein, that gives you the happy belly feeling without weighing you down, and keeps you full for hours - you could even use a tin of fish. You've got colourful veg for vitamins and minerals, with the option of going for high protein veg for those of us who like to hit up the protein at every opportunity. You've got your leafy greens which are super good for you and some lovely fats for extra deliciousness and of course all the health benefits they have which we don't care so much for because we were sold at the deliciousness.

Go forth and make amazing salads. (download link here)


Here's one I made earlier.

A post shared by Claire Salem (@firelotusfitness) on

Want to make healthy eating so easy it's automatic? Check out my amazing nutrition coaching programme where you can learn to build healthy habits into your life for health and performance.

Also, you should definitely sign up to my mailing list. I don't sent you nonsense, but I do send you more of this sort of thing.


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