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Changes are afoot

I'm adding amazing new value to my online nutrition coaching.


It's a bit subtle so I thought it would be good to break it down  here.


Reflecting upon improving my coaching practice.


I've been working for a while with people who want to focus solely, or principally on their diet and lifestyle, rather than the "traditional" exercise focused Personal Training.

As with all my work I have been considering how I can do this better. Deliver a better service, be more efficient, get better results etc. This is what I found....

I really enjoy working with individuals, talking them through the issues they are encountering and helping them to see their way past their personal roadblocks.

Checking in and regular accountability is great. While many exercise based clients find between-session check ins unnecessary, nutrition clients tend to need consistent support and more frequent reminders.

While I am great at the theory stuff, and always a teacher at heart, I am not sure that going over the basics with every single client, is the best use of their precious one to one time.

I've built a library of resources to pass on, but appropriately concise information at client level (rather than trainer level) without "bro science" is constantly on my "hunt" list.

I enjoy a habit based coaching approach, and it pays off for the people I'm working with, which is great. Certifying with Precision Nutrition has really helped me refine that and I love the PN coaching process.

Keeping up lines of communication with clients can be tricky. Trying to keep track of emails as they descend my inbox, remembering who I need to contact when I've seen their message on the go.

In fact I'm juggling sign up forms, progress, initial reports and workouts over a number of platforms. It's manageable, but it could be better.

Working with clients from week to week, deciding which habit might work best next is flexible, but a long term, progressive plan works better. Taking on short term clients means they need to see results fast, but fast results aren't always the best results.

The next step


So I had the opportunity to start working with Precision Nutrition's own coaching tool, Procoach.

I'm going to spare you the nerdy details, but the system is amazing, and this is why:

As my client, you have me as your coach. I tailor your programme, I check in with you, I keep you on track, talk you off ledges and out of late night cake binges, just as before.

But you also get the PN team. Nutrition Legends, Dr John Beradi and Krista Scott-Dixon, leading short, online videos and tasks that support my coaching process. That means you can find out the whys and hows of the coaching programme from them, then spend your time with me clearing up the questions and talking about YOU and YOUR PROCESS.

It's PN's brains, and my heart.

You check in every day, and I can see when you have checked in, what tasks you have done and generally how you are getting on. Every day. You can also message me, and I you, within the system, where lasting records of our messages, plans, goals, tracking data etc are stored for both of us.

The Procoach curriculum lasts up to 12 months. It takes you systematically through all the skills and strategies you need to implement sustainable healthy eating and a great relationship with your food and your body's needs. Just the same as before, I can adjust it to suit your needs, preferences and current skillset, but as we are committed from start to finish you are guaranteed amazing results. And I know that because PN has been using this same programme to coach tens of thousands of successful clients.

I've already started filling my client slots on this programme, and it's looking great so far. If you want to join me, then head on over to my website and get yourself signed up while I still have space.


Want a sneak peek?


I'm also offering this bundle of resources at the moment, they give you an idea of how my coaching methods work, and why it's a bit different to the calorie counting, quick fix, fad diets out there.

Click here and you can get some super useful graphics.

I'm really excited to be going forward with this, I can already see that it's going to add great value to my clients' coaching experience.

And a bigger peek?


Here's a little video that shows you how it works.

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